My D50 bird archives are done (finally!)

Well, after several months’ labour, I have finally finished putting a bit of order in the photos I took with my old Nikon (the very reliable D50). I have discovered to my great surprise that, over the past two years, I have captured around 70 different bird species with this camera, mostly in the Great Vancouver area. Some of these photos are not really usable for a blog, but many are. As a result, I will draw from these archives to publish one or two photos, twice a week (on Wednesday morning and Sunday afternoon). Each post will include only one species and, when they are distinguishable, a photo of each sex.

This first photos in this series feature the beautiful Spotted Towhee (en français: Tohi tacheté / scientific name: Pipilo maculatus):

Spotted Towhee (male) | Near Lost Lagoon, Stanley Park | Vancouver, BC | December 2011

Spotted Towhee (male) | Near Lost Lagoon, Stanley Park | Vancouver, BC | December 2011

Choosing the first bird to feature was difficult, at first. Then I found this photo and my mind was made up. Why? Because it is one of the first bird photos that I took after we moved out to Canada’s West Coast and represents one of the reasons I decided to renew and deepen my double hobbies of birding and photography. The detail and colours of the feathers, not to mention *that* red eye just blew me away and convinced me that I must continue trying to find more shots like it. And I have, thanks to the fabulous birds that call this part of the world home!

Now I should add that since this bird was evidently “baited” with rice (by some unknown person, I hasten to add), I have decided to end this post with a more “natural” shot that I took in early 2013:

Spotted Towhee (male) | Near Lost Lagoon, Stanley Park | Vancouver, BC | January 2013

Spotted Towhee (male) | Near Lost Lagoon, Stanley Park | Vancouver, BC | January 2013

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “My D50 bird archives are done (finally!)

    1. Thank you, I am glad you liked it! It always surprises me that such an active, noisy bird can be so hard to photograph. But they are skittish and tend to remain in the bush, so to speak, so branches and leaves always seem to get in the way. Similar problems can occur with respect to Fox Sparrows. Having said that, for some strange reason, both species seem to be easier to photograph in this part of the West Coast.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s